Celebrating the strange legacy of Tim Allen’s ‘Last Man Standing’

When ABC announced it was canceling Tim Allen’s sitcom Last Man Standing after six seasons, conservative viewers cried foul, insisting that the show was being canceled for its conservative point of view. It’s true – Hollywood tends to skew liberal (at least when it comes to the creative side), but we’re also looking at a season that saw the end of The Real O’Neals, a coming-of-age sitcom about a queer teen. Last Man Standing‘s cancellation is all the more surprising because even though it was a sleepy performer in its Friday night time slot, it was still pulling in an average of about 8 million viewers per season. ABC also canceled Dr. Ken, the other Friday night sitcom, which may mean that the network is looking to revamp its Friday night schedule.

Allen, the star and one of the executive producers of the show, has been an outspoken conservative in the last few years. He also discussed the difficulty in being conservative in Hollywood. He likened it to 1930s Germany, which goes to show you that though he’s a funny guy, he isn’t necessarily a smart guy. But Last Man Standing, which produced 130 episodes will now live in syndication on basic cable, alongside his other long-running sitcom Home Improvement, and will probably easily forgotten.

It’s easy to see why. It’s not a great sitcom. It’s an old-fashioned multi-camera sitcom, filmed live in front of an audience, with a laugh track. The actors march onto the set, hit their marks, and announce their punch lines to the merriment of the studio audience. In light of single-camera sitcoms like Modern Family and The Middle, watching Last Man Standing can be a jarring experience. The laughter – which is probably genuine with just a touch of sweetening – feels aggressive and rote. The acting is broad. The sets are laid out so that everyone is facing the audience. There’s an artificiality to Last Man Standing that feels disruptive, and the show’s limits cannot transcend the issue.

Still, it wasn’t a terrible show, and it deserves some recognition of what it was trying to do. Tim Allen’s character, Mike Baxter, wasn’t the first conservative on a TV sitcom. Two of the most famous examples would be Archie Bunker on All in the Family and Alex Keaton on Family TiesAll in the Family aired for nine seasons, from 1971 to 1979. During that time the country saw three presidents: Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Jimmy Carter. For the bulk of the show’s run, Archie Bunker became a voice of the reactionary American conservative during the Nixon and Ford administrations. When show creator Norman Lear created Archie, he wanted to lampoon the knee-jerk response to the growing progressive movement. His show aimed to ridicule the backlash to anti-war movement, feminism, gay rights, and civil rights. But the writers and star Carroll O’Connor took what could’ve been a toxic character and imbued him with dignity and appeal. His conservatism was played for laughs, and the scripts always made sure that the audience knows that Archie was wrong, but he evolved into a nuanced and complicated character, who was able to outclass Lear’s oft-preachy tone.

But Tim Allen is no Carroll O’Connor. One of the main debits of the show was its star. On Home Improvement, Allen was able to parlay his comedic persona – the grunting, wannabe Alpha-male – into an appealing sitcom character. Home Improvement was a smash hit, lodged permanently in the top 10 for all of its 8 seasons (peaking at an incredible number 2 in season three). At one point in the show’s history, over 20 million people watched Tim Allen’s Tim Taylor hurt himself in a variety of ways by misusing and abusing power tools. Even though the show was a ratings hit, critics were dismissive, and though it pops up form time to time in syndication (often paired with Last Man Standing), it’s barely remembered as an important program of the 1990s.

Despite Allen’s presence, the show still manages to say something, despite its deadening blandness. Those who defend the show’s conservatism – and those who lambaste it – are missing the point. Yeah, Mike Baxter was a conservative and he hated Obama and Hillary Clinton, but the anti-liberal jokes were incredibly soft (this could be because as Allen pointed out, most of the writers were liberals) When Mike Baxter got on a rant against something – whether it’s political correctness, gender, or taxes – he morphed into the archetypal cranky old white guy. There was little bite to what he was saying, because he wasn’t saying all that much.

And there was so much potential. The show ran during the Obama Administration when so much of the country was divided by a backlash against his progressive policies and against the fact that a Black man was running the country. Mike Baxter could’ve been a voice for that backlash – a humanizing voice that would complicated the image of the eccentric and violent yahoos who burned effigies of Obama at protests. Because the show is centered on an upper-middle class family, none of the economic issues that the country faced, namely the crawling recovery from the Great Recession, are handled in any sort of meaningful manner. During the Obama administration, queer rights had made some startling leaps forward, and the show barely mentioned queer people. The reason for this is probably because Friday nights on ABC tend to skew to family-oriented shows. In its salad days, ABC marketed Friday nights with a bloc of family sitcoms, TGIF. Such classics of mediorcrity like Family Matters, Perfect Strangers, My Two Dads, and the magnus opus of suckitude, Full House were event watching for a lot of 80s kids. So the real estate probably wasn’t the most hospitable for a hard-hitting, socially relevant sitcom.

But there’s another show in Last Man Standing, a far more interesting show that hardly anyone looks at: and that show stars Nancy Travis. Travis is TV’s most appealing character actress/comedienne, whose career is marked by an inability to find a sustaining vehicle for her abundant talents. The fact that Last Man Standing gave her work for six straight years is reason enough to praise the show because Travis is a find.

On the show, Travis played  Vanessa Baxter, a geologist who is married to Allen’s sporting goods store exec. It’s with Vanessa that the show starts to gel into something somewhat interesting. The story of how a moderately progressive, intelligent scientist can stand being married to a sometimes-blowhard like Mike Baxter makes for some solid TV watching. Unfortunately, despite Travis’ lovely presence, too often, she was pushed into the role of the straight man to Allen’s grumpy goof. Her politics skew center-left, and she supported Hillary Clinton – though her liberalism is treated much like Mike’s conservatism, it’s a trait, like “blonde” or “pretty” and there is precious little exploration into why Vanessa likes Clinton outside of her being a woman and a Democrat. One episode decent episode explored Vanessa’s personal convictions well. In it, she had to defend her support of fracking to a group of high school kids. Fracking is indefensible, and I think this was probably Allen’s influence, but it gave Vanessa some shading – something that doesn’t exist in the fictional world of Last Man Standing. If Travis was spun off into her own show, one of say, a recently widowed Vanessa Baxter working as a geologist or high school teacher, and juggling the demands of motherhood (and grandmotherhood), then I’d probably watch that show.

But Allen was the star of Last Man Standing and his comedic fingerprints are everywhere. He never worked to challenge his audiences, nor did he want them to question their assumptions. Instead, he was a genial, if slightly insufferable, dad who would grouse  about how weird kids are nowadays. Last Man Standing could’ve been a good show if it found a strong voice and stuck to it and was committed to it; instead, it coasted on being mildly dickish, sticking it to liberals, when really, they weren’t watching it anyways.

Leave a comment

Filed under Comedy, commentary, politics, Sitcom, TV, Writing

Melissa McCarthy steals the show on her 5th ‘SNL’ hosting gig

HOST and MUSICAL GUEST Bumper PhotosMelissa McCarthy joined the Five-Timers Club, having hosted Saturday Night Live for the fifth time this year. She’s only the fifth woman to reach the milestone, and it’s clear that she’ll probably have the honor of hosting a few more times. McCarthy is the kind of guest host who would’ve been a cast member – she’s a strong physical comedienne and versatile actress. In her fifth hosting gig, she once again stole the show and dominated the sketches with her on point physical comedy and her ability to create fully-formed characters in the tiny five-minute sketches. Her episode was also helped tremendously by some above-average writing, as well (something that elevated last week’s Chris Pine episode, too).

As per usual, the cold open was a political sketch, with Alec Baldwin popping by to do his increasingly diminishing Donald Trump. At this point the writers have gotten lazy with the Trump sketches and are relying on simply lambasting the guy’s physicality and verbal tics. This week, Trump’s in the news because he fired James Comey, head of the FBI. This development provided SNL with some much-needed oomph, and as a result, though not a great sketch, it still shone brighter than the other Trump sketches because it actually had something to say.

McCarthy’s monologues are always delightful. Often the writers have her do a musical number or perform some kind of slapstick, but this time, it was a sweet bit in which she grabs a mom, Joan, from the audience, and takes her on a breakneck speed tour of the studio. On her way, the pair gets to meet Baldwin, Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively, musical guests HAIM, and some of the cast members. Joan’s a good sport and McCarthy gets to use her improv chops (she’s a Groundling alumna), and it makes for a sweet bit. I’m liking the “taking a tour of the studio” gimmick that is becoming more popular among the hosts (Jimmy Fallon did a sparking version of David Bowie’s “Let’s Dance” with a dance troupe around the studio).

The best of this episode combined great jokes and quality storytelling. Add to that McCarthy’s acting chops (Oscar nominated, no less), and you get what could be conceived as an ideal episode. The cold open was pretty toothless, but McCarthy’s return as Sean Spicer was great. Aidy Bryant cameoed as Sarah Huckabee Sanders as a supposedly even-keeled, thoughtful alternative to the blustery Spicer (though I think Huckabee Sanders is simply a slick oil saleswoman, as well). The sketch takes an unexpected turn when Spicer hears that he may be the latest in Trump’s administration to be given a pink slip. He plunges into self doubt as he jets away on his lectern-mobile to Trump’s golf course in New Jersey to confront the guy. The sketches loses some steam at the end (and yeah, the open-mouth kiss was predictable), but it was great to see McCarthy’s Spicer do his crazy, violent antics (and his demonstration of Comey’s firing by using Russian nesting dolls was great), but it was smart to fold in some more actor-y moments in which Spicer begins to doubt his importance within the Trump administration.

McCarthy also does wonder with her Gaye Fontaine, the wizened Hollywood vet who is on a film panel with her pal Debette Goldry (Kate McKinnon). Joining the two “legends” are Lupita Nyong’o (Sasheer Zamata, finally given something to do) and Cecily Strong’s Marion Cotillard. Often when a host joins a cast member in a recurring sketch, the writers create some weird twin of the recurring character, and the results are often kinda sad because a) the host is not as funny as the cast member and b) the “other” character is rarely as interesting. It’s smart then that in this sketch Gaye Fontaine is a character on her own, that relates to Debette because they both had to suffer through the same sexist indignities in Hollywood yesteryear. The implications behind these sketches is that actresses now don’t know how good they have it. And yeah, there is some of that, but there’s also a pointed critique in how long sexism has endured in the film industry. McCarthy does some great character work as Gaye, and whoever told her to play the lady as a stroke survivor was pretty aces.

But as great as McCarthy is at creating characters, she’s also a wonderful physical comic, so the game show sketch was predictably a highlight. The premise is so simply and hacky, it’s almost embarrassing – essentially it’s “how to get Melissa McCarthy to be repeatedly pied in the face.” And the actress takes it like a trouper, being pelted with pies repeatedly. It’s low brow, broad, and ridiculous, but McCarthy goes all in, recalling Lucille Ball at her best. The bravest comics are the ones who abandon all sense of vanity.

Even low key sketches in which McCarthy is merely featured – I’m thinking of the production logo sketch and the birthday sketch – benefit from the star’s presence. In the logo sketch, especially, she is given room to play, creating yet another one of her unlikable social misfits.

The Weekend Update sketch was okay, but it was Pete Davidson and Strong who made the sketch truly remarkable. Davidson appeared, essentially doing his stand-up act. He was candid and honest, talking about his sobriety – his delivery is idiosyncratic – some may be put off by his lazy manner, but I find it appealing. I also like how unsparing he was in talking about getting sober (and his story about going to horse therapy is hilarious, especially when shares how as a child he didn’t know he was allergic to horses because his family was too poor to ever be around them). Strong appeared as Cathy Anne, a politically-astute grotesque whose life is filled with drugs and tragedy, but she manages to soldier on, despite her demons. Cathy Anne initially was a recurring character that was about just how ugly and ridiculous Cecily Strong can be. As time went on though, she became a great voice for someone who is fed up with how ugly and ridiculous politics can be.

Though Saturday Night Live is ostensibly live, some of its highest moments are the pre-taped bits. In a beautifully filmed and acted piece, Kyle Mooney and Leslie Jones are in a committed relationship – with an adorable moppet named Lorne – that is in trouble. Her rising star and career demands means that he’s feeling left out and neglected. What I love about this film is that the writers and the performers don’t fall into the racist and sexist trap of making it about how tiny, nebbish Mooney is in love with the tall and athletic Jones; instead, it’s treated pretty straight forward. The absurdity comes in Mooney’s besotted misery and Jones’ busy indifference. Jones has gotten a lot of flack for her live performances, because she often will fumble a line or miss a cue. These pre-taped sketches show audiences just what an asset she is to the show.

The other pre-taped sketch was also a winner – the Amazon Echo, which helps old people out. As with the pie sketch, it’s a threadbare conceit: old people are old! They like it to be hot in a room! They’re cranky! What makes this sketch work is the pure performances of the cast members. Again, Jones is an appealing presence as an old woman who eyes some neighborhood kids warily, while Kenan Thompson is a marvel as a befuddled grandpa who relies on his Amazon Echo to decipher just what he needs from it. Both the pie sketch and the Amazon Echo sketch prove that one doesn’t need to reinvent the wheel to be funny – if we have to go back to cliches – which is sometimes unavoidable – doing a committed job with engaging actors can sometimes be enough.

Next week, the host will be fellow Five-Timer Dwayne Johnson (who will be hosting for the sixth time). Johnson, out promoting Baywatch, is a genial and funny presence himself. If the writing is as good next week, then we’re looking at a pretty strong streak for SNL.

Leave a comment

Filed under Celeb, celebrity, movie, politics, TV, Writing

The Divas and the Bee Gees

In the 1970s, the Bee Gees could do no wrong. Alongside Donna Summer, the band dominated the pop charts with a string of hit single (24 of their singles hit the US top 20 and 26 hit the UK top 20) and multi-platinum albums, most notably the soundtrack to Saturday Night Fever.

With the disco backlash, came an unfair revisionist assessment of the Bee Gees that lumped them with trashy disco artifacts like Disco Duck, Ethel Merman’s disco album, and the Brady Bunch variety show. That’s unfortunate because the Brothers Gibb – Barry, Robin, Maurice – were among the craftiest and most professional songwriters in pop music history. Don’t believe me? Just listen to the pillowy ballad “How Deep Is Your Love” and tell me you didn’t swoon.

But starting in the 1980s, the Bee Gees started to experience a decline in their commercial fortunes. But the Gibbs were ace songwriters so they were never in any danger of fading away. Even though pop radio lost interest in their music, they turned to producing other artists, and enjoyed a healthy second career in the 1980s as go-to songwriters. One of their biggest and most recognizable hits of the 80s was the classic Dolly Parton/Kenny Rogers duet “Islands in the Stream” (which appeared on Rogers’ 1983 Gibbs-written album Eyes That See in the Dark). 

The Brothers Gibb also found themselves working with three pop divas, revitalizing their careers and bringing them back to the top of the pop charts. Barbra Streisand, Diana Ross, and Dionne Warwick were the most successful female acts of the 1960s and for a large part of the 1970s. But by 1980, they started to feel a similar dip in their sales as the Bee Gees did. The trio of legends felt a jolt in their careers with their Gibbs-helmed records: Streisand’s Guilty, Ross’ Eaten Alive, and Warwick’s Heartbreaker.

GuiltyStreisand’s Guilty (1980) was the most successful of the three albums and one of the most successful albums in Streisand’s career (it went on to sell over 6 million copies). It went to number on the album charts in the US and the UK, and it spawned a string of hit singles, three of which found their way into the top 10. By 1980, Streisand had cemented herself as a crossover superstar, winning Oscars for her movie work and a bunch of Grammys. During the 1970s, she shifted away from her supperclub pop of the 60s, and became a soft-rock/adult contemporary star. Hooking up with gooey songwriters like Alan and Marilyn Bergman, Marvin Hamlish, and Michel Legrand, Streisand was the proto-Celine Dion, releasing albums of fillers larded with hit singles. Like a lot of mainstream pop singers, Streisand joined the disco craze and found success with some dance songs, including the monster duet “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” with Donna Summer.

But by 1980, Streisand, though still massively popular, looked like she was in a rut. Enter Barry Gibb – that hairy-chested Adonis of pop who completed Streisand’s Malibu by way of Brooklyn transformation. Guilty is easily one of the most sublime and listenable pop albums of the last 40 years. Gibbs joined their longtime collaborators Albhy Galuten and Karl Richardson to produce a light and frothy record that works as a breezy soundtrack to a casual jaunt down Rodeo Drive.

Guilty sounds like high-quality leftovers from Saturday Night Fever. The Gibb trademarks are all there: the shuffled percussion, the frothy synths, the simple chord transitions, airtight backup harmonies. Streisand does a great job in easing up on her famous histrionics, too. The danger of pairing a powerhouse like Streisand with a seeming lightweight like the Gibbs is that she has the potential to overwhelm the music and production (the audio version of a bull in a china shop). But Streisand’s heavy, gigantic belt is kept in check, as she ably reigns in her near-operatic voice, sounding like a credible fourth Bee Gee.

As a duet partner, Barry Gibb proves to be a capable counterpoint to Streisand. Their voices blend perfectly and seamlessly, as if they were blended in a recording studio Kitchen Aid Blender. Streisand never goes full disco, though “Promises” with its galloping gait comes very close as does the plastic faux funk of “Never Give Up,” that fails to be convincing but is an admirable failure.

No, people listen to Streisand to luxuriate in that brassy voice, and she sounds best on ballads. Good thing the Gibbs are great at building solid slow dance songs. They’re corny, sappy, but impeccably crafted. And Guilty would be one of the few times in her career when Streisand doesn’t sound totally lost jumping on current pop trends.

HeartbreakerEven though the Bee Gees were known for their funky music, let’s be honest, they were squares, which is why it makes sense that they were a match made in heaven for Streisand as well as Dionne Warwick, a singer of uncommon talent and tonality, but one that not necessarily the most soulful on the radio (despite being tangentially linked to soul greats like Aretha Franklin, Cissy Houston, and Whitney Houston). Warwick’s early 1980s career was a strange animal. One of the leading hit makers of the 1960s, her 70s output slowed down, but then she hooked up with Clive Davis and Arista, and suddenly, she seemed somewhat relevant to pop radio again.

Like Streisand, Warwick found that hooking up with the Bee Gees would prove to be a commercial crafty thing to do as 1982’s Heartbreaker sold over 3 million copies. Its title track was one of Warwick’s biggest hit. Like Streisand, Warwick feels more at home in slower numbers, and so Heartbreaker is filled with romantic ballads. Unlike GuiltyHeartbreaker doesn’t feel quite as ambitious or well made. Nothing is wrong with the album per se, and the title song is infectious, but the album as a whole feels like a collection of songs that Streisand rejected for Guilty.

But like Streisand, Warwick’s voice is a perfect compliment for the slightly gauche production of the Brothers Gibb. She has a loud, husky voice that sounds at once affected and distant. Her phrasing is distinct and precise and there’s a chasteness in the way that she sings her love ballads. In the 1960s, she was paired with her musical kindred spirit Burt Bacharach, and he was the only musician who could make her dry delivery sound impassioned and urgent (“Don’t Make Me Over” is a gorgeous plea that Warwick sells beautifully). The Gibbs aren’t as successful and the result is that Warwick’s arch delivery sounds drained and mechanical. The whole affair feels drab and rote and the result is a parody of Adult Contemporary conventions (the songs – including a slick version of “Our Day Will Come) sound like something that would be played during the slow dance at cruise ship.

Eaten Alive (Expanded Edition)

Diana Ross is the only singer of the three had has the chops to do dance music. In fact some of her best solo work as been for the clubs. Like Streisand and Warwick, Ross also saw her audience shift as musical trends moved around. By 1985, when her Gibbs-produced LP Eaten Alive was relieved, Ross was in commercial limbo. She left Motown for RCA and her seemed to become merely an extension of her celebrity. She sold well, initially, but Eaten Alive came at a time when Ross was struggling to keep up with young pop divas like Madonna or Jody Watley. And unlike Streisand and Warwick, Ross always dove headfirst into pop trends, chasing them for pop success (she was rewarded for her foray into post-disco dance with the Chic-produced diana which sold four million copies and spit out a string of top 10 dance hits including the classics “I’m Coming Out” and “Upside Down”)

Eaten Alive is the least successful of the three albums covered, both artistically and commercially. By 1985, it seems as if the Bee Gees had given their best work to other artists and struggled to find something good for Ross. The title track is interesting because it not only features work by the Bee Gees, but superstar Michael Jackson. His fingerprints are all over the angular dance track; in fact, his tight-fisted, clipped sound crowds  out the Bee Gees pretend-soul  (Jackson’s soulful growl ends up stealing the show at the song’s end, despite Barry Gibb’s caterwauling). The other dance number “Crimes of Passion” works a little better, but that’s because Ross’ impassioned performance makes the slight song seem better than it really is.

The ballads aren’t any better. Often the production overwhelms and buries Ross’ pretty croon, and she can sometimes sound muffled. This is never more true than in “Experience” a by-the-numbers love song with Ross sounding lost in the song’s mix (there’s a crazy echo that acts like a reverb, rending her nearly incomprehensible).

But there is one unequivocal triumph: “Chain Reaction,” a cracking number in which the Bee Gees do a beautiful job aping Holland-Dozier-Holland, and give Ross a stomping Motownesque number that sounds like a top shelf song she would’ve recording with the Supremes. The production is grand and dramatic, and Ross is engaged and fantastic. It’s nostalgia at its best, and its brilliance overshadows the rest of the songs on Eaten Alive (and is easily Ross’ best single post from the mid 1980s) and is the best and most innovative song from the trio of albums reviewed. It also went to number 1 on the UK charts.

As they continued with their own recording career, the Bee Gees continued writing and producing for other artists, but Diana Ross’ Eaten Alive was the last time that the band devoted its combined talents to update an iconic pop diva’s sound and career. Streisand, Warwick, and Ross moved on from their brief Bee Gee sojourns with varying success. Streisand, followed up Guilty was a long list of platinum albums and reunited with Barry Gibb on the sequel Guilty Pleasures (2005). Warwick’s career continued to coast with periodic blips of huge career success, peaking with 1985’s “That’s What Friends Are For” a treacly ballad she recorded with Elton John, Gladys Knight, and Stevie Wonder, which was a gigantic hit (the proceeds went to AIDS research). Ross had arguably the most fitful and frustrating career of the three. After the relative failure of Eaten Alive, she bounced back with the gold-selling Swept Away, which featured her last US top 10 hit “Missing You.” She then failed to ever regain her commercial fortunes in the US (though in the UK and Japan she was still a reliable hit maker scoring top 10 hits all the way into the 200os).

Leave a comment

Filed under Celeb, celebrity, music, Writing

I voted for Macron

Emmanuel Macron won in the French elections, resolutely thumping Marine Le Pen’s bid for office with over 65% of the votes. I voted yesterday, going to the Lycée Français de Chicago. I don’t speak French very well, nor do I read it very well and was worried about being grilled by the French officials who would sniff dismissively at me. Last time I had to deal with the French government was when I was renewing my passport at the French consulate, and struggled to explain in French to the staff that I would be more comfortable speaking in English. I’m not sure if it was because of my bad French, but it didn’t go well, and I left the consular office with a headache from trying to make myself understood.

I was luckier yesterday because I didn’t really have to speak much. I was able to read enough to figure out which line to go to and I knew enough in French to say hi, give my name, and grab the ballots. Oh, let’s get to the “ballots.” The voting comprised of two slips of papers, each with a candidate’s name, and a little brown envelope. I then scuttled over to a booth and put Macron’s name in the envelope and then after being confirmed and checked for the second time off a manifest, I dropped the envelope into a large glass box.

Normally I wouldn’t vote. I lived in the United States for over 30 years, and held little interest in French politics. But the last year has been so ridiculous. Starting with the Brexit referendum in June, it felt as if we couldn’t get through a month without some fresh hell popping up. Theresa May and Donald Trump are the faces of unfettered populism that has gripped most of the west.

And France wasn’t immune. Marine Le Pen ran on a similar campaign of suspicion, xenophobia, racism, and isolationism. And she was popular. In the first round of the elections, she came in second, and was moving on to the second round. Despite the polls confirming that Le Pen wouldn’t win, I was nervous. The polls promised Brexit wouldn’t pass and that Hillary Clinton would win. I was cautiously optimistic that Macron would win, but didn’t take anything for granted.

And though we’re celebrating Le Pen’s loss, it’s not over yet. Despite her promises to the contrary, May is holding a snap election in June. Because the Brexit negotiations aren’t going well, and there a lot more difficult than May imagined, she’s hoping to cleanse the government of anti-Brexit naysayers who are gumming up her plot to destroy the UK. Confident that she’ll be able to purge parliament of Labour and Lib Dem MPs, May is banking on the general elections to go as well for her as the locals went a few days ago, when the Torys picked up 130 seats, while Labour shed 120 seats. UKIP, the racist alt-right party in the UK, lost all of the local seats, but that’s not a silver lining – it’s aluminum. UKIP helped destroy the UK’s relationship with the EU, and is riding off into the sunset, happy to allow the Torys to finish the job.

But for now, I’m relieved. And I hope that Le Pen’s loss – predicted, but still a surprising – will be a necessary road block to the populist movement in Europe. Hopefully, Le Pen’s loss will put an end to talk of dismantling the EU. Hopefully, Le Pen’s loss will put an end to talk of curbing immigration, freedom of movement, and the acceptance of refugees. I’m hoping.

2 Comments

Filed under commentary, Nonfiction, politics, Writing

I got my MFA, now what?

Yesterday I walked across the stage and got my diploma, and now I am part of an elite crowd, I’m an MFA grad. For the past four years, I worked with other wannabe writers, workshopping stories, reading other writers, and revising and tightening manuscripts. I was lucky in that I had some of the best teachers out there – Janet Wondra, Priscilla Perkins, Kyle Beachy, Suzanne Scanlon, Chrisian TeBordo. Each instructor made an important impact in my writing, by both challenging me when I was going in the wrong direction and encouraging me when I was going in the right direction.

The other students I worked with were better writers than I. They were talented writers who had to write. It was in them. Me? I’m not a naturally gifted writer. I’m not a great writer. I’m a solid-to-decent writer who can write a great piece once in a while after a ton of work. That’s not to say that the other writers in the program weren’t hard workers, they were, but they were starting with a stronger base. But that isn’t new for me. School has never come naturally to me. I’m lucky in that I love school, and I love being in school, so I don’t mind the extra work it takes to catch me up to the other students.

A few years back, in a class about arrealism, I was assigned to write a writer’s manifesto. It was an interesting assignment because I never thought about a writer’s manifesto. I thought about why I was writing. I thought about my writing heroes – David Sedaris, Bill Bryson, Tina Fey – and I tried to understand why they started to write. What inspired them?

As a reader, I was always drawn toward humor. I love comedy. When writing, I wanted to make my readers laugh in the same way that Sedaris does. When we presented our manifestos to the class, other students had high minded reasons for going into writing, and name checked some literary greats. My inspiration? Madeline Kahn and Teri Garr. I wanted people to enjoy themselves when reading my work. While my classmates cited Austerlitz as their inspiration, I said Erma Bombeck.

Getting my MFA is definitely a bittersweet experience for me. I feel a sense of accomplishment, because I was able to juggle full-time work, a part-time job teaching, and going to grad school part time. It was a lot of work at times, and there were many overnight sessions of reading and annotating. But I love all of this. I love studying and going to school.

So, it’s a bit bitter that I’m done with my MFA work because it’s probably the last time I’ll be in school. I’ve identified myself as a student for a long time. And now that part of my life is over. Now, I have to compete with the more-talented members of this MFA gang for spots in literary anthologies, journals, or chapbooks.

For MFA, I had to write a thesis – mine was a book-length collection of essays. This past Tuesday, I participated in a reading, in which I read an excerpt of a story about my dad’s recent battle with cancer. The reception was positive. The people in the audience laughed and reacted warmly to my story. Predictably, the other writers were better: Matt Styne, Phyllis Lodge, and Chicago-area writer Jessica Anne were brilliant, each reaching the kind of creative high I can only dream of attaining. They’re just better. I don’t say this as a self-deprecating thing. It’s just honesty.

Right now, I got a couple things bubbling away. I’m writing some film pieces and am looking at other calls for papers. I’m also continually working out on paper (yeah, I write on paper first – I got stacks of legal pads) how I feel about Europe, the EU, Brexit, and London. Stuff keeps changing over there, so I feel like I’m never done.

Something sticks with me from the reading on Tuesday. We were introduced by the professors, and Christian TeBordo introduced me, and called my work sophisticated, which is a very generous and kind compliment. I always wanted to be called sophisticated. When I think of the word sophisticated, I think of Oscar Wilde, Noël Coward, or Dorothy Parker. It’s nice company (I just realized that I inadvertently implied that Christian compared me to Wilde, Coward, and Parker – he didn’t, he’s not nuts).

So, now I’m hearing the faint dulcet tones of a PhD program calling me like a siren from a distance. I’m not naïve and know that a PhD can be an expensive albatross, and it isn’t a guarantee. But I like the idea of being a perpetual students (though I don’t like the idea of owning a perpetual student loan).

Leave a comment

Filed under Book, commentary, Writing

The queens try acting with so-so results on ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’

Ever since RuPaul’s Drag Race moved to VH1, the reruns have been aired on weird hours, so I missed the last two episodes, but was able to catch this week’s episode “9021-HO” which is predictably a take on Beverly Hills 90210. The guest judges this week were Tori Spelling and Jenni Garth, and the episode’s competition was an acting challenge – never a good showcase of the contestants. For the most part, the acting challenges are a way for audiences to see how sloppy and unprepared the contestants are, though the comedy queens manage to shine.

But in this season, the funniest queens have all been booted out, which makes the competitions somewhat tedious to watch. And add two guest judges who seem woefully underqualified for their jobs, and you get a meh episode. Spelling and Garth are game enough, but really, if the producers wanted to inject some much-needed oomph, they should’ve gotten Tiffani Theissen and Shannon Doherty. Spelling – an outspoken queer ally – can be good for some humor (when she’s self-referential, she can be surprisingly sharp and ironic), but for this episode, both actresses are supposed to “direct” the queens and give them acting tips. Tori Spelling is giving acting lessons.

Anyways, the queens are given a “script” and it’s a mess. The queens lurch through predictable sex jokes, and two stand out: Shea Couleé and Trinity Taylor (who wins). Trinity channels the extravagant slapstick of Jennifer Coolidge (Michelle Visage name checked Coolidge, too), while Shea took on the scene-stealing role of Grandrea Zuckerwoman. What’s even cooler about Shea’s performance is that she took on the role after Aja threw a tantrum after being initially cast in the role. She pouts and throws an actual tantrum, which she regrets immediately, after she realizes just how childish she looked in front of the other queens. It’s rare that the queens are so self-aware, and it’s refreshing to see Aja taking responsibility for her actions. It’s not enough to save her, but I admire her integrity, even if she banged the pooch during the competition.

Though Trinity and Shea did win, it was a hollow victory because the competition was so absurd. The runway is tied to the 90210 theme by being vaguely 1990s, which vaguely meant big hair – but then again, when does a drag queen not have big hair?

The lip synch for your life was the early 90s club classic “Finally” by CeCe Peniston. It’s a drag classic (and will forever be attached to Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert in my mind). The bottom two were Aja and Nina Bo’nina Brown, whose runway looks were okay (I guess) but failed in their performances. Nina’s runway look was the most hi-de-ous look – a sorta Cats meets Drag Race look. The makeup was disgusting and was very unattractive (it was busy and had way too much going on and her face looked more like a road map than a cat’s face)

The high point of the show was during the makeup scene, in which the queens share personal stories. Trinity’s story is especially touching as she saw her mother die when she was a child, and then she had to watch as her grandmother die. I usually find the editing during these sequences especially crass and cynical as the cutting and the splicing make it look like a chase to who had it worse. I wish the editors used a more careful hand when packaging episodes, because the impact is lessened when the sharing starts to look like a contest. There is some of that in “9021-HO” which is unfortunate because the stories are heart wrenching.

Despite its new home, Drag Race has been lackluster so far. I’m hoping the rest of the season will rally. The next episode is the comedy challenge with Fortune Feimster (I love her and she’s very, very fab). Jaymes Mansfield, Charlie Hides, and Cynthia Lee Fontaine are gone, and they were the most obvious stars of a comedy challenge. My money right now is on Trinity, who did so well in this episode, channeling comic hero Jennifer Coolidge.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

100 things I love about the UK

Theresa May is competing with Marine Le Pen and Donald Trump for the West’s most evil politician (her latest pile of hot garbage is working to curb non EEA/EU family members from moving to the UK with their EEA/EU loved members), and it’s easy for a lot of EU/EEA folks to feel disenchanted about the UK. I have to admit, when I read complaints about EU expats or the EU, and how we’re to blame for the UK’s ills (never mind that the UK government has been steadily chipping away at its infrastructure for years with austerity, going back to Thatcher), it’s easy to join in on the “let’s crap on the UK” parade. And at times, I do indulge in some anti-British sniping in a comment thread on Facebook or Twitter.

But this post is about what I love about the UK. These are the hundred things – these aren’t in any order – that I love about the UK. And yes, this is very London-centric because I know London well, but I haven’t been to other parts of the UK (outside of Edinburgh), so this is very much what’s important about the UK to me – it’s not a list of what is the “greatest” thing about the UK – after all, none of my 100 things include sports and science (reflecting my lack of interest in both subjects).

  1. London – easily, the greatest city in the world. I’m looking to make the plunge and move to London (am applying for jobs as we speak), because I’ve fallen in love with London the first time I was there back in 2003.
  2. The literature – I’m an English literature scholar and a voracious reader, and British literature is some of the best I’ve ever read.
  3. Agatha Christie – the first Agatha Christie novel I read was one of her later ones, A Caribbean Mystery, with Miss Marple. I read it in camp when I was twelve. I didn’t like camp because there were lots of mosquitoes and my bunk mate left food in his drawer that attracted a colony of ants, but, I picked up Christie’s A Caribbean Mystery and fell in love with her ability to create these vibrant, lived-in worlds. After that book, I zipped through her other works, and have been a lifelong Agatha Christie fan.
  4. The food – yes, the food is very good in the UK. Contemporary British cuisine isn’t just steak and kidney pie or fish and chips (though those items are heavenly). Because of globalization, freedom of movement, and immigration, there are lots of different cuisines that have influenced modern UK cooking.
  5. Delia Smith. I’m a foodie and I love food writing, and I think that Delia Smith ranks alongside Elizabeth David, M.F.K. Fisher, and Julia Child as a titan of food writing.
  6. Speaking of Elizabeth David, I read French Provincial Cooking and Italian food annually.
  7. Speaking of reading writers annually, Jane Austen. Easily the greatest writer in the world. Pride and PrejudiceEmma, and Sense and Sensibility are my three favorite books ever. I’ve read Pride and Prejudice – easily – at least 20 times, and each time I read it, I discover something new about the book.
  8. Tony Benn – the Bernie Sanders before Bernie Sanders was a thing. I discovered Benn by picking up one of his diaries. He was a prolific diarist and an incredible advocate for progressive left-wing causes (and I loved how obsessed he seemed to be with Pizza Express)
  9. Soul II Soul – with much respect to Chic, I think Soul II Soul is the greatest soul/dance band ever.
  10. Shirley Valentine – it’s a great movie. Not a classic or a genre-busting film, but one that gives me all of the feels whenever I watch it. I fell in love with the travel narrative because of that film.
  11. The London Trocadero – yes, yes, I know this is the Times Square of London, and the hippest of the hip hate the Trocadero (you know what, I love Times Square), but the London Trocadero is where I had my epiphanous moment and I realized, “I have to live here.”
  12. King’s College London – it was the first college that accepted me into its PhD program. Unfortunately, I couldn’t accept the invitation, but I still love it for that reason.
  13. Emma Thompson. Funny, beautiful, smart. What else could one ask for in a woman.
  14. Once while walking down the street in Bayswater, a jogger was running behind me, and I stepped out of his way, and he called out over his shoulder, “Thanks, mate!”
  15. Truly, Madly, Deeply – Anthony Minghella’s first film that introduced me to the charms of both Alan Rickman and Juliet Stevenson. It was a great movie, mismarketed as the “thinking man’s Ghost” when it was so much more. A gentle, lovely comedy about love, loss, friendship, and grief.
  16. French & Saunders, together and apart. It seems like everything these ladies touch, turn to gold. Whether it’s Absolutely FabulousThe Vicar of Dibley, or Jam and Jerusalem, I know that if I catch either one of them, I’ll be entertained for hours.
  17. Love Actually – Woody Allen wrote valentines to Manhattan, and Love Actually is the perfect valentine to London.
  18. The Lonely Londoners by Sam Selvon. One of the greatest post-WWII, post colonial novels about living in London. It was a major work that focused on the lives of working-class Black people in London. It’s what prompted me to do research in Black British literature, and why I’m so interested in the topic.
  19. Stephen Fry – because he’s really smart.
  20. Simon Amstell – because he’s really smart.
  21. Jane Goodall – because she’s really smart.
  22. Helen Fielding, easily one of the funniest writers I’ve ever read, and the closest heir to Jane Austen’s crown as the Queen of Literary Comedy
  23. Salman Rushdie – The Satanic Verses was a huge influence on the way I looked at literature and its power to spur conversations – many uncomfortable – about identity.
  24. The Beatles – because, duh.
  25. The Rolling Stones – because, bigger duh.
  26. Dusty Springfield – because, biggest duh.
  27. J.K. Rowling – she restored my faith in the kindness of billionaires and despite the overwhelming shadow of Harry Potter, she was able to create a neat side career as a brilliant mystery novelist under the pseudonym, Robert Galbraith.
  28. Patricia Routledge – she is more than just Hyacinth Bouquet
  29. Prunella Scales – she is more than just Sybil Fawlty.
  30. Angela Lansbury – she is more than just Jessica Fletcher.
  31. Virginia Woolf – After reading Mrs. Dalloway, I spent my time envying her because I wanted to write just like her
  32. Boy George – great singer, wonderful songwriter, and caustic wit.
  33. Richard Curtis – his movies are middle-of-the-road sap, but I can’t help getting sucked in whenever I watch one of his big-hearted, sentimental stories.
  34. Zadie Smith – White Teeth and On Beauty are two books that have influenced the way I write and read, and her nonfiction prose is some of the smartest I’ve ever read.
  35. E.F. Benson for introducing the world to those glorious monsters of pretension, Mapp & Lucia.
  36. Sally Phillips – the only comedienne I’ve ever seen who can steal a scene from comic Einstein, Julia Louis-Dreyfus.
  37. Willy Russell – a great comedic writer who finds the inherent dignity in working-class people who want to do better with their lives and are striving something more.
  38. The Foreign & Commonwealth Office – one of the most fulfilling and challenging periods in my career, and one that I treasure and hold close to my hear. I am honored that I was once a staff member.
  39. Jane Eyre – my favorite Brontë novel about a young woman who faces obstacles in her life and faces them with dignity. It’s also a great novel about the importance of working hard and for not succumbing to life’s travails. Jane Eyre is also one of the wittiest characters in Victorian literature.
  40. Ricky Gervais – because of Extras and The Office.
  41. Catherine Tate – because of The Catherine Tate Show and Doctor Who (and I’m willing to overlook her so-so work on the US-version of The Office)
  42. Princess Diana – a lady who could’ve easily had teas and shopped (and I’m sure she did all that), but that wasn’t enough, she also advocated for the homeless, was an AIDS/HIV activist, and an anti-landmine warrior.
  43. David Hume – one of the most intimidating writers I’ve ever read, and not sure if I understood all of An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, but was an important introduction to philosophy and empiricism.
  44. Armando Iannucci for bringing the world Veep.
  45. Yo! Sushi – whoever thought of putting sushi on a conveyor belt is a genius. Now, if I can just rig it, so that the convey belt simply glides the food right into my mouth would be the best.
  46. British Alternative Comedy – a movement in comedy from the 1980s, that spawned such icons like Jennifer Saunders, Ben Elton, Rik Mayall, Dawn French, Helen Lederer, Ade Edmondson, Ruby Wax, Jo Brand.
  47. Alan Bennett – his Talking Heads monologues are incredible. He’s a master of tragicomedy.
  48. Pet Shop Boys – ironic, detached, smart, and stylish. They have created some of the most literate and intellectual dance music for the last 40 years. Their first two LPs, Please (1986) and Actually (1987) are great Thatcher-era reflections on the gilded glamour of the 1980s. “West End Girls” is a song that takes me back to London each time I hear it.
  49. Tate Modern. When I visted the Tate Modern a couple years ago, it had a great exhibition on pop art, and I was able to see original Andy Warhols and Keith Harings.
  50. The Graham Norton Show – whenever I get sad, I just watch the red chair segments on The Graham Norton Show and all is right with the world.
  51. Meera Syal – Anita and Me is a great novel and Meera Syal is a very, very funny lady.
  52. Stonehenge – I’m not much of a history buff, and I don’t “do” ancient ruins, but Stonehenge is pretty fantastic and mysterious. Built around 2000 BC (!), folks are still figuring out what Stonehenge was about, but many think it was for ceremonies.
  53. Newham – my favorite part of London, it’s where I lived when I was in London. It’s not fashionable or tony like the Mayfair or Belgravia, but it’s a great area. The Queen’s Market is a wonderful draw, and I loved the brick row houses. It’s a very diverse area, too, with lots of ethnic restaurants. I lived on Green Street, next to the Upton Park train stop.
  54. Hanif Kureishi – his films My Beautiful Laundrette, Sammy and Rosie Get Laid, and London Kills Me is a great, stylish pop look at British national identity in 1980s Thatcherite London. His books like The Buddha of Suburbia and The Black Album are also wonderful looks at race and ethnicity in the UK. He asks difficult questions about extremism, nationalism, xenophobia, and multiculturalism.
  55. Tracey Ullman, who made “hearing voices in your head” into an Emmy-winning career.
  56. Annie Lennox – one of the few singers who has been able to leave a legendary band – the Eurythmics – and make an even greater impact as a solo artist. Diva and Medusa are her two best albums, and though the follow ups didn’t measure up to those albums, Diva and Medusa have enough classic performances that they have become legendary. She has a huge loud voice, second only to Dusty Springfield when it comes to blue-eyed soul.
  57. Stock Aitken Waterman – yes, yes, yes, I know they were peddlers of mushy, plastic pop during the 1980s, but underneath the prefab gloss and deadening drum machines were some of the hookiest pop songs ever. The trio introduced us to Kylie Minogue and Jason Donovan, worked with legends like Debbie Harry and Donna Summer and became Internet legends when their Rick Astley tune “Never Gonna Give You Up” became a meme in 2007.
  58. Merchant Ivory Productions – nothing says classy, elegant English movie like “Merchant Ivory Productions.” I can practically see myself, lolling about in a rowboat in the Lake District, dozing underneath the hot sun of an English summer.
  59. Naomi Campbell – her picture should be in the dictionary under the words beauty and fabulous. Imperious, difficult, and demanding, it’s too bad Naomi Campbell can’t sing (she tried, bless her) because if she could, she would be the perfect descendant of Maria Callas.
  60. Kazuo Ishiguro – a literary chameleon, he can shift and change his author voice depending on the project he’s working on. His best work The Remains of the Day works as a wonderful midcentury novel of class and politics. His other classic novel Never Let Me Go is a credible work of dystopic science fiction.
  61. Judi Dench – a national treasure. And yes, Tracey Ullman, she probably would get away with shoplifting.
  62. Kristy MacColl is a funny, sad, witty singer-songwriter whose range is dizzying and breathtaking. Whether it’s country, girl group, new wave, punk, or alternative pop, she was able to write and perform in these different styles, telling sad and funny stories of wistful dreaming.
  63. Mr. Bean – Rowan Atkinson’s most mainstream creation, Mr. Bean is a Chaplinesque creation of a man child who stumbles through his life – grimacing and grumbling along the way – and finding creative solutions to the obstacles he faces. Atkinson is a genius physical comic who imbues Mr. Bean with a poignant absurdity.
  64. Caitlin Moran – she’s my hero. I want to be Caitlin Moran. When Donald Trump won the presidential election, I turned to her for sustenance and succor.
  65. Emma Chambers – she is the definition of scene stealer. If you can overshadow Dawn French, Hugh Grant, and Julia Roberts, you know you’re a genius.
  66. Nick Hornby – I’ve always been jealous of Nick Hornby because no one person should be able to write funny, relatable, and touching stories like he does. And he’s easily one of the best essayists around, and I feel like he’s my literary spirit animal. Whenever I try to write music or pop culture essays, I ask myself “What Would Nick Hornby Do?”
  67. Christopher Hitchens – he was an asshole a lot of the times and his essays sometimes made my head explode in anger. But he was probably the smartest writer that I ever disagreed with.
  68. Mark Kermode – one of the greatest film critics alive.
  69. Alexander McQueen – a genius fashion designer who took an avant garde, punk aesthetic and wrapped it in haute couture fashion.
  70. Tracey Emin for sharing with her audience the names of everyone that she has ever slept with from 1963 to 1995.
  71. “Smalltown Boy” – the greatest coming out song ever. Jimmy Somerville’s angelic falsetto croons over the the thick synthpop/house production, and his lyrics tell the story of a queer kid who deals with homophobia.
  72. Different for Girls – I wish more people knew about Richard Spence’s 1996 film about a man who falls in love with a trans woman. It’s a gentle, tiny drama that is ahead of its time in its depiction of trans issues in the mid 1990s. It dates a bit, and there have been stronger more accurate depictions of trans relationships (and yeah, a cis man is playing a trans woman – not great) But it still deserves celebration and a higher profile.
  73. William Shakespeare – Well, obviously…
  74. The Britcom – As Time Goes By, Are You Being Served?, Keeping Up Appearances, Absolutely Fabulous, Good Neighbours, Steptoe and Son, The Vicar of Dibley, French & Saunders, Gimme Gimme Gimme, To the Manor Born, The Young Ones, Girls on Top, Father Ted, Cold Feet, Coupled
  75. The British Museum – where I got to see my first Da Vinci.
  76. Jennifer Paterson and Clarissa Dickson Wright  – they taught me how to eat.
  77. Bleak House, Little Dorrit, The Pickwick Papers, Nicholas Nickleby, A Christmas Carol, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, and everything else that the great Charles Dickens had ever written. Social critique was rarely ever so beautifully and devastatingly captured on paper.
  78. Vivien Leigh for Scarlett O’Hara and Blanche DuBois.
  79. Paul Gilroy – Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack should be required reading for everyone.
  80. Kingsley Amis – I think Lucky Jim made me laugh harder than any other novel.
  81. Stella Gibbons – I think Cold Comfort Farm made me laugh harder than any other novel.
  82. Douglas Adams – I think The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy made me laugh harder than any other novel.
  83. Of Human Bondage – the first “great” novel I’ve ever read and the one that made me want to be a literature scholar.
  84. Kobena Mercer – one of the most astute and brilliant essayists and critics out there. I still teach his article on the politics of black hair.
  85. Gilbert & George – challenging, strange, unsettling, uncompromising, and creative.
  86. Mike Leigh, who shows his audience a different kind of London – the complex and complicated world of working-class London that is rarely portrayed on film. This isn’t Richard Curtis’ scrubbed London of gleaming skyscrapers, red phone boxes, and elegant sidewalk cafes; instead, Mike Leigh’s films show an uncompromising London, a London that is struggling from the indifferent Tony Blair Administration. If one wants to know just how Brexit became a reality, one should simply look at Leigh’s films, that show just the kind of landscape of poverty and disenfranchisement that made the environment hospitable for Brexit.
  87. Kathy Burke – an underrated genius. A woman who could make blinking hilarious.
  88. BBC Television
  89. Adele – the woman who will bring back Cool Britannia
  90. 30 St Mary Axe – known as the Gherkin or the lipstick building, it’s the building that means London to me. With the St. Andrew Undershaft church in front of it, shows why I love London so much: a mixture of the old and the new -a medieval church standing in front of the gleaming glass skyscraper.
  91. P.G. Wodehouse – he makes me laugh every time, never fail with his effete and classy wit (I always wanted to be the uber-efficient Jeeves)
  92. The Edinburgh Festival Fringe – an art festival that exposed to me all kinds of visual and performance artists, including some great stand-up comedy (it’s where I got to see the great Joan Rivers)
  93. Joan and Jackie Collins – not great artists by any means, but they lived like no one else.
  94.  Beautiful Thing – Jonathan Harvey’s a sensitive artist who wrote the lovely film Beautiful Thing, a tiny little coming of age film about a young queer student who falls in love with a student athlete. It’s a great movie about a working-class home and one of the few queer films in which the hero doesn’t die, isn’t killed, or presented as a villain or image of pity.
  95. The YBAs – the moment during the 1980s when British visual artists were as successful as pop stars and made the UK lead the world when it comes to contemporary art. To me, the gleaming, glossy success of the YBAs was the epitome of Cool Britannia, and how global, dynamic, and forward thinking British culture can be.
  96. Amy Winehouse – the brilliant love child of Nina Simone and Dusty Springfield, who had a stark, cracked voice soured by a tragic life that ended far too soon.
  97. Kadija Sesay – a brilliant scholar and writer whose talk I attended when in London that made me fall in love with Black British culture and Black British literature.
  98. The Photographers’ Gallery – My partner and I found this gallery by accident. In London, we were looking for a Border’s, but didn’t know that it was closed at that point, so we were just walking through the dark side streets. When stumbled upon the gallery, we popped in and saw a fantastic exhibition about Eastern European immigrants who were victims of trafficking in Western Europe. When we move to London, we’ll make the Photographers’ Gallery one of our haunts.
  99. That for the present, the UK is part of the EU.
  100. Mother Mash – one of my favorite places to eat, in one of my favorite places in London, Carnaby Street. It’s touristy and gimmicky, I know, but bangers and mash is easily the best food ever, and being able to choose your own kind of mash, bangers, and gravy is just pure genius.

Leave a comment

Filed under commentary, Nonfiction, Writing